Alternate Text

Original text


Business


From Parts to Products: Why Trade Logistics Matter

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • The sixth edition of Connecting to Compete reveals a persistent gap between high-income and low-income countries on logistics performance. High-income countries score, on average, 48% better on logistics than low-income countries.
  • Logistics relates to how efficiently countries can move physical goods across and within borders. A country’s performance in this area can determine how it participates in international markets.
  • Emerging trends in logistics include eco-friendly logistics options, labor shortages in both developed and developing countries, and preparedness for cyber threats.

Alternate Text

Washington, 24 July 2018 – Take a close look at your smart phone for a moment. What do you see? A glass screen. A button equipped with fingerprint recognition. A camera lens, flashlight, microphone, and speaker. Each of these components, and others – including chips, processors, batteries – are independently sourced from companies located all over the world and assembled into a finished product at factories, often in China. Any smart phone you purchase, and its components, has likely passed through customs several times, landed on multiple countries and continents, and been touched by countless workers.

Logistics makes all this possible. A $4.3 trillion industry affecting nearly every country in the world, logistics is the network of services that supports the physical movement of goods within and across borders. It comprises an array of activities including transportation, warehousing, brokerage, express delivery, terminal operations, and even data and information management. How efficiently goods can move through these systems to their final destinations is a key determinant to a country’s trade opportunities.

“Logistics are the backbone of global trade,” notes Caroline Freund, Director, Macroeconomics, Trade & Investment Global Practice at the World Bank Group. “As supply chains become more globally dispersed, the quality of a country’s logistics services can determine whether or not it can participate in the global economy.”


Benchmarking Logistics Performance

Utilizing surveys of logistics professionals, the LPI offers two perspectives on a country’s performance:

The World Bank Group has been scoring countries on these issues every two years since the inaugural edition of Connecting to Compete in 2007. Consistently, high-income countries, particularly those in Western Europe, emerge as world leaders on logistics. In fact, the LPI score of high-income countries is 48% higher, on average, than low-income countries. Among the 30 top performing countries, 24 are members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

“Across the board, we have seen most countries investing in logistics-related reforms, especially in the areas of building infrastructure and facilitating trade,” explains Jean Francois-Arvis, Economist at the World Bank Group and report co-author. “Despite these efforts to modernize services, developing countries face many remaining challenges. This explains a persistent gap between high- and low-income countries in terms of logistics performance.”

But income alone is not the sole determinant of a country’s LPI score. Vietnam, Thailand, Rwanda, China and India all outperform their income groups. These countries tend to have access to sea ports or large international transportation hubs.

For individual countries, logistics performance is key to their economic growth and competitiveness. Inefficient logistics raise the cost of doing business and reduce the potential for integration with global value chains. The toll can be particularly heavy for developing countries trying to compete in the global marketplace. Governments can use the LPI to better understand the link between logistics, trade, and growth, and what policies they can enact to globally compete.


2018 LPI: Key Findings


SUBMITTED BY Gabriela Huerta

Source: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2018/07/24/