Your Image Is Not Your Brand

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Copyright © 2021, Norman Katz, Katzscan Inc., www.katzscan.com

I have to thank my long-time and much valued accountant for my great company name, Katzscan.  I owe her so very much for her belief in me and her support before and through my journey and evolution as an entrepreneur.  To this day, people tell me how much they love my company name.  I think it could, and should, win some type of an award. 

My logo is the creation of a neighbor and friend of mine who volunteered to design it for me when I first started my company.  It has not changed in 25 years, nor does it need to.  Again, people still tell me how much they like my logo, and so do I. 

Despite my company’s great visual and appealing imagery, this is not my brand.  I don’t rest on these laurels, as much as I am proud of them.

When I started, I focused on the following core qualities which are still key attributes of my business model today:

  1. Provide independent consulting, not beholden to any contractual relationships. 
  2. Establish credibility, and make it transparent.
  3. Create a unique value proposition that no one else can provide.

I don’t resell any hardware or software.  As such, when I suggest products, solutions, or services, it is based on my several decades of experiences.  Whether my clients go with my suggestions or not is up to them.  What I recommend in one situation may be different than what I recommend in another situation.  My recommendations are purely based on what is good for the client, not what might be good for any contractual relationships that I have in meeting sales goals or commission benchmarks, because none of those things matters to me, as I don’t have them.  As an independent consultant, my first priority is what is best for the client.

My credibility is highlighted through my article and trade journal writings, my US national and international speaking engagements, and with the publication and worldwide distribution of my three exclusive books.  This effort, and it is a lot of worthwhile work, elevates me from being an expert to an authority.  The companies that I have helped are also listed on my website.  It is transparently visible on my websites for all to see, not just because I am proud of it all, which of course I am, but because I want to always answer the question: “Why should I hire Norman Katz to help solve my company’s problems?” 

My peers have often informed me that I am unique in my combined operations-technical skill set.  I can dig into data and extract insightful information.  I can bridge business requirements and software functionality through either creative data setup or innovative software function use, saving significant costs versus expensive custom modifications.  I use my superior communication skills to clearly convey complex concepts both verbally and in writing, whether explaining a data analysis with graphics, or creating user or technical documentation, or writing a software proposal or supply chain guide.  With regards to my specialty knowledge, such as supply chain vendor compliance, whereas people used to tell me that I was such an expert that I figuratively wrote the book on the subject, now I can inform them that I literally have done so: it is my second of currently three published books.

Improving business performance.  Educating customer employees.  Saving companies money.  Helping my clients grow.  Acting ethically, but this does not mean rolling over and not being firm when I need to be, especially when wrongs need to be righted. 

My brand – not my logo – is my execution.  And my brand is what I do and how I do it.  In other words, it is my end-to-end performance. 

Yes, my logo and company name help to create a great first and lasting impression.  But I know that what I will be really remembered for is my execution, and that this is really my brand.

Products and services today have been reduced to a commodity.  Labels in apparel mean little anymore: as long as people believe that they are purchasing from what they believe is a reputable source – e.g., Amazon – the name means little. 

The quality of the item will keep people coming back or turn people away.  No matter how good your automobile looks, if it doesn’t run well, you’re not going anywhere.    How does your company define itself to its employees, investors, customers, supply chain partners, community, and potential investors?  Is your brand based solely on a name and a logo, or is it backed up by end-to-end execution?  Flash is all fine and well, but execution ensures long-term survival.

About the Author: –

Norman Katz is the President of Katzscan Inc. (www.katzscan.com), a US-based consultancy celebrating its 25-year anniversary in January 2021.  Katzscan specializes in improving supply chain performance, business operating effectiveness, strategic software applications, and information insights.  Norman is a multiple book author and a worldwide speaker and writer.

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